Secretary of State Steve Simon adddresses the media Thursday, Jan. 18 at the Minnesota State Capitol when he spoke about the start of early voting in Minnesota’s 2024 presidential primary whose early voting starts on Jan. 19. From left are Melanie Hazelip, Voter Outreach Director; David Maeda, Director of Elections and Bill Ekblad, Election Security Navigator. Photo: Screengrab
Secretary of State Steve Simon adddresses the media Thursday, Jan. 18 at the Minnesota State Capitol when he spoke about the start of early voting in Minnesota’s 2024 presidential primary whose early voting starts on Jan. 19. From left are Melanie Hazelip, Voter Outreach Director; David Maeda, Director of Elections and Bill Ekblad, Election Security Navigator. Photo: Screengrab

Early voting for the Minnesota Presidential Primary on March 5th begins this Friday, January 19, 2024.

Speaking at a press conference Thursday, Secretary of State Steve Simon said Minnesotans will have to declare a party choice from among the three recognized major parties, and receive a ballot with candidates only representing that party. There will be three parties participating in the Minnesota presidential primary; Democratic (Democratic-Farmer-Labor, commonly known as Minnesota DFL), Republican and Legal Marijuana Now.

Parties had until Jan. 2 to submit a list of candidates to be included in their respective ballots. The DFL ballot has nine names while the Republican and Legal Marijuana Now ballots have five names each. All ballots have a space for write-ins.

” If you choose to vote as early as tomorrow or any day between tomorrow and March 5, there are two main ways to do that,” Simon said, ”if you choose to vote absentee, there are two main ways to do that. One is that you can do that in-person at a local election office, typically a city or county facility or you can request that a ballot be mailed to you and you can vote from the comfort of your home.”

The presidential primary will be the only race on the ballot for March 5. The state primary for races such as the U.S. Senate and House will be on August 13.

If you are not yet registered to vote, the deadline to do so is Feb. 13 and you can do so online at this link.

If you are not registered by Feb. 13, you can still vote on March 5 by registering at your polling place.

If you vote early and your candidate drops out before “Super Tuesday”

Two of the candidates on the Minnesota Republican ballot, Chris Christie and Vivek Ramaswamy, have already dropped out but will still appear on the ballots voters receive.

Should you vote early and your candidate drops out before the primary election day, you can go to your early voting location before March 5 and ask that they cancel your absentee ballot, or on the primary election day (March 5) go to your polling place and tell them you want to vote in-person instead.

Teenagers turning 18 by March 5

If you have a 17-year old that will be turning 18 by March 5, they are eligible to vote and can pre-register at this link.

Where to vote early

Before Primary Election Day, you can vote early at your city hall, or other community accessible locations your county might make available.

Go to the links below for Anoka, Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey and Washington counties for information on how and where you can vote early.

Also visit the Minnesota Secretary of State website on more information regarding the 2024 presidential primary in Minnesota, to register to vote, or to check or update your registration.

Author

  • Born and raised in Kenya's coastal city of Mombasa, Tom is the Founder, Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of Mshale which has been reporting on the news and culture of African immigrants in the United States since 1995. He has a BA in Business from Metro State University and a Public Leadership Credential from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He was the original host of Talking Drum, the signature current affairs show on the African Broadcasting Network (ABN-America), which was available nationwide in the United States via the Dish Network satellite service. On the show, he interviewed Nobel laureates such as 2004 Nobel Peace prize winner, Professor Wangari Maathai, the first woman from Africa to win the peace prize and heads of states. Tom has served and chaired various boards including Global Minnesota (formerly Minnesota International Center), the sixth largest World Affairs Council in the United States. He has previously served as the first Black President of the Board of Directors at Books for Africa. He also serves on the boards of New Vision Foundation and the Minnesota Multicultural Media Consortium. He has previously served two terms on the board of the United Nations Association. An avid runner, he retired from running full marathons after turning 50 and now only focuses on training for half marathons.

About Tom Gitaa Gitaa, Editor-in-Chief

Born and raised in Kenya's coastal city of Mombasa, Tom is the Founder, Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of Mshale which has been reporting on the news and culture of African immigrants in the United States since 1995. He has a BA in Business from Metro State University and a Public Leadership Credential from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He was the original host of Talking Drum, the signature current affairs show on the African Broadcasting Network (ABN-America), which was available nationwide in the United States via the Dish Network satellite service. On the show, he interviewed Nobel laureates such as 2004 Nobel Peace prize winner, Professor Wangari Maathai, the first woman from Africa to win the peace prize and heads of states. Tom has served and chaired various boards including Global Minnesota (formerly Minnesota International Center), the sixth largest World Affairs Council in the United States. He has previously served as the first Black President of the Board of Directors at Books for Africa. He also serves on the boards of New Vision Foundation and the Minnesota Multicultural Media Consortium. He has previously served two terms on the board of the United Nations Association. An avid runner, he retired from running full marathons after turning 50 and now only focuses on training for half marathons.

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