The White House on Monday, Jan. 23, 2023 announced President Biden has nominated former U.S. Senator Carol Moseley Braun, left, and Dr. Monde Muyangwa, right, the USAID assistant administrator in Bureau for Africa as board members to United States African Development Foundation (USADF). Photos: Courtesy of PBS and USAID

President Biden on Monday announced the nominations of Monde Muyangwa and Carol Moseley Braun to the board of United States African Development Foundation (USADF), the independent U.S. Government agency that provides grants of up to $250,000 to African enterprises and social entrepreneurs.

Born and raised in Zambia, Dr. Muyangwa currently serves as the assistant administrator in the Bureau for Africa at the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), a role she has held since September 2022.

Carol Moseley Braun, the first Black woman to serve as U.S. Senator, will become chair of the USADF board taking over from Obama appointee Jack Leslie, the White House announced.

The appointments come soon after the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit the president hosted in Washington in December, where he pledged America’s commitment of more than $55 billion to help 50 countries combat food insecurity and the climate change factors that lead to it.

Prior to her role at USAID, Dr. Muyangwa was director of the Africa Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, where the White House says she “led programs and research designed to analyze and offer practical, actionable options for addressing some of Africa’s most critical, current, and over-the-horizon issues.”

For 11 years starting 2002, Dr. Muyangwa was the dean of academics at the National Defense University’s Africa Center for Strategic Studies (ACSS).

Dr. Muyangwa is a Rhodes scholar and received a doctoral degree in international relations, a bachelor’s degree in politics, philosophy and economics, both from the University of Oxford in England. She also has a bachelor’s in public administration and economics from the University of Zambia.

Carol Moseley Braun made history in 1993 when she was sworn in as the first Black woman U.S. Senator representing Illinois, and only the second Black senator since the Reconstruction Era, according to congressional records.

After her time in the Senate, Braun went on to be the United States ambassador to New Zealand, following an appointment by President Clinton. She serves on several public service boards and commissions, including the DuSable Museum of African American History and has been awarded several honorary degrees, the White House said.

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  • Born and raised in Kenya's coastal city of Mombasa, Tom is the Founder, Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of Mshale which has been reporting on the news and culture of African immigrants in the United States since 1995. He has a BA in Business from Metro State University and a Public Leadership Credential from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He was the original host of Talking Drum, the signature current affairs show on the African Broadcasting Network (ABN-America), which was available nationwide in the United States via the Dish Network satellite service. On the show, he interviewed Nobel laureates such as 2004 Nobel Peace prize winner, Professor Wangari Maathai, the first woman from Africa to win the peace prize and heads of states. Tom has served and chaired various boards including Global Minnesota (formerly Minnesota International Center), the sixth largest World Affairs Council in the United States. He has previously served as the first Black President of the Board of Directors at Books for Africa. He also serves on the boards of New Vision Foundation and the Minnesota Multicultural Media Consortium. He has previously served two terms on the board of the United Nations Association. An avid runner, he retired from running full marathons after turning 50 and now only focuses on training for half marathons.

About Tom Gitaa

Born and raised in Kenya's coastal city of Mombasa, Tom is the Founder, Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of Mshale which has been reporting on the news and culture of African immigrants in the United States since 1995. He has a BA in Business from Metro State University and a Public Leadership Credential from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He was the original host of Talking Drum, the signature current affairs show on the African Broadcasting Network (ABN-America), which was available nationwide in the United States via the Dish Network satellite service. On the show, he interviewed Nobel laureates such as 2004 Nobel Peace prize winner, Professor Wangari Maathai, the first woman from Africa to win the peace prize and heads of states. Tom has served and chaired various boards including Global Minnesota (formerly Minnesota International Center), the sixth largest World Affairs Council in the United States. He has previously served as the first Black President of the Board of Directors at Books for Africa. He also serves on the boards of New Vision Foundation and the Minnesota Multicultural Media Consortium. He has previously served two terms on the board of the United Nations Association. An avid runner, he retired from running full marathons after turning 50 and now only focuses on training for half marathons.

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